National Weather Service Predicting Severe Thunder Storms Sunday and Monday, Hot and Humid Monday – Lightning and Heat Safety Information

National Weather Service Predicting Severe Thunder Storms Sunday and Monday, Hot and Humid Monday - Lightning and Heat Safety Information

Lightning and Heat Safety Tips provided by NWS/NOAA

Lightning: What You Need to Know

NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area!!

If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you.

When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter: a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up.

Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder.

Indoor Lightning Safety

Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity.

Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets.

Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.

Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

Last Resort Outdoor Risk Reduction Tips

If you are caught outside with no safe shelter anywhere nearby the following actions may reduce your risk:

Immediately get off elevated areas such as hills, mountain ridges or peaks

Never lie flat on the ground

Never shelter under an isolated tree

Never use a cliff or rocky overhang for shelter

Immediately get out and away from ponds, lakes and other bodies of water

Stay away from objects that conduct electricity (barbed wire fences, power lines, windmills, etc.)

Heat Safety Tips and Information

Children

Make sure your child’s safety seat and safety belt buckles aren’t too hot before securing your child in a safety restraint system, especially when your car has been parked in the heat.

Never leave your child unattended in a vehicle, even with the windows down.

Teach children not to play in, on, or around cars.

Always lock car doors and trunks–even at home–and keep keys out of children’s reach.

Always make sure all children have left the car when you reach your destination. Don’t leave sleeping infants in the car ever

Adults

Slow down. Reduce, eliminate or reschedule strenuous activities until the coolest time of the day. Children, seniors and anyone with health problems should stay in the coolest available place, not necessarily indoors.

Dress for summer. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing to reflect heat and sunlight.

Put less fuel on your inner fires. Foods, like meat and other proteins that increase metabolic heat production also increase water loss.

Drink plenty of water, non-alcoholic and decaffeinated fluids. Your body needs water to keep cool. Drink plenty of fluids even if you don’t feel thirsty. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney or liver disease, are on fluid restrictive diets or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a physician before increasing their consumption of fluids. Do not drink alcoholic beverages and limit caffeinated beverages.

During excessive heat periods, spend more time in air-conditioned places. Air conditioning in homes and other buildings markedly reduces danger from the heat. If you cannot afford an air conditioner, go to a library, store or other location with air conditioning for part of the day.

Don’t get too much sun. Sunburn reduces your body’s ability to dissipate heat.

Do not take salt tablets unless specified by a physician.

Worker Safety

Outdoor workers can be at a higher risk to the effects of excessive heat. See Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) resources and recommended practices when working under hot conditions.

Drinking water often; resting and cooling down in the shade; gradually increasing workloads and allowing more frequent breaks for new workers or workers who have been away for a week or more (acclimatization); and knowing symptoms, prevention, and emergency response can help prevent heat-related illness and death. Check weather forecasts ahead of time to be better prepared.

 

 

 

About Echo Menges

Reporter for The Edina Sentinel Covering Knox County, Missouri Since 2010