“Camerata” performance at Culver-Stockton to celebrate modern music

“Camerata” performance at Culver-Stockton to celebrate modern music

CANTON, Mo.– Culver-Stockton’s avant-garde ensemble, Camerata 808, will open the season at precisely 8:08 p.m., Friday, Feb. 1, in Merillat Recital Hall in the Robert W. Brown Performing Arts Center on campus. Their concert will feature six important works by some of the most significant composers of experimental music.

Edgard Varese’s “Density 21.5” (1936), an early work for solo flute, will feature Chloee Dunham, senior music major from Dawson, Ill. Aden Eilts, senior music major from Prairie Village, Kan., and principal bassist with the Quincy Symphony Orchestra, will play Ben Patterson’s “Solo for Double Bass” (1962), a composition from the Fluxus movement popularized by artists such as Yoko Ono, John Cage and Bertold Brecht. Soprano Hannah Kauffmann, senior music education major from Festus, Mo., will join Camerata 808 colleagues to sing Luigi Dallapiccola’s “Goethe-Lieder” (1953), a 12-tone work for solo soprano and three clarinets. Other works planned for the evening’s performance include “Having Never Written a Note for Percussion” (1971) for solo tam-tam by James Tenney and Christian Wolff’s “For 5 or 10 People” (1963), a piece that requires an unusually high degree of ensemble communication. Rounding out the program is Terry Riley’s “Tread on the Trail” (1965), a work which employs a system similar to his famous “In C,” but in a distinctly jazz style.

Camerata 808 is a highly select ensemble comprised of advanced music students and faculty members. Performances of avant-garde music are often unusual but always interesting.

This performance is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact the Division of Fine Arts at 573-288-6346.

 

 

 

 

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