Putnam County Runs Past Knox Co. Eagles, 28-8

Putnam County Runs Past Knox Co. Eagles, 28-8

By David Sharp

Putnam County was able to win the line of scrimmage and ultimately the October 2, Tri-Rivers Conference football meeting with Knox County by a final score of 28-8.
Kyle Hoskins rushed 48 times for 274 yards and scored four Putnam County touchdowns.
The teams exchanged 60 yard, grind it out drives in the first quarter. Knox County fumbled the football seven times, losing three and gave up three unanswered touchdowns. The Eagles had a 37 yard touchdown run called back by penalty in the second half.
Putnam County (2-4, 2-3) battered the Eagle defense for an 11 play, 60 yard scoring drive on the game’s first possession.
Kyle Hoskins scored on an 11 yard run at the 6:32 mark of the first quarter. Hoskins ran in the two point conversion for an eight point Midget lead.
Knox County (2-4, 0-3) countered with a 59 yard scoring drive of their own. Cameron Kirmse was effective on wingback counter plays. The Midgets were able to limit Damon Hemmerling to nine carries for 13 unofficial yards.
Damon Hemmerling ran the ball in from a yard out for a Knox County touchdown with 1:36 showing on the first quarter clock. Cameron Kirmse’s run evened the score at eight all.
Knox County was able to stop a Putnam County drive on their 13 yard line. The Eagles went three and out on their next possession, and had to punt into a 21 mph wind.
Putnam County took advantage of a short field, and capped a 30 yard drive with a Kyle Hoskins touchdown. Hoskins scored on a 22 yard run at the 6:54 mark of period two. The two point run failed and Putnam County held a 14-8 edge.
The tough Midget defense stopped Knox County on their next set of downs, forcing a punt. The homecoming jacked Midgets made the Eagles pay for their inability to make first downs with another short field score.
Kyle Hoskins capped a 47 yard drive with a 36 yard touchdown run with 3:03 to play in the first half. Kyle Hoskins ran in the two point conversion for a 22-8 lead.
Andrew Wagner recovered a fumble for Putnam County, stalling a last minute Knox County drive on the Midget 25. Knox County simply made too many mistakes to beat an underrated football team on their field at homecoming.
“There is no secret to it. It’s old fashioned football. You win with defense, you control the ball with offense,” said Putnam County coach Tony Mueller. “Our kids like to play in your face football. You play physical, and you hit with technique. This year we played a lot of teams close in the beginning.”
Putnam County held Brookfield scoreless from scrimmage and limited state ranked South Shelby to 19 points defensively. The Midgets beat Scotland County at Memphis 28-12 last week much the same way the defeated the Eagles.
“Winning is contagious. We have been on a downhill slide the last two years. We had to learn how to win again,” said the first year Putnam County head coach.
“Last week was huge for us. These kids are playing confident football. They feel like that if they play their game, they can play with anybody,” said Coach Mueller.
Putnam County doubled the Eagles in first half total offense, 203 to 99 yards. Neither team attempted a pass in rainy, windy conditions. Knox County fumbled the football four times in the first half, losing one. Putnam County recovered their lone fumble of the first half.
Kyle Hoskins had 28 carries for 200 yards and three touchdowns, all in the first half.
Both defenses forced punts on their first second half possession. Knox County executed an option play to Tristan Lonberger, good for an apparent 37 yard touchdown in the third quarter. The play was called back on a holding penalty.
The Midgets stopped Knox County on downs at their 43 yard line. Kyle Hoskins scored his fourth touchdown of the night at the 11:47 mark of the fourth quarter on a one yard plunge. The two point run failed and Putnam County led 28-8.
Knox County put the bit in their teeth and took the football inside the Putnam County ten yard line from their 34. Cameron Kirmse had a 23 yard pass reception from Keenan Gillaspy in the second half.
The Eagles attempted a wide receiver reverse. Knox County fumbled the football. Dallas Halley recovered on his 12 yard line. Putnam County took the football with 5:35 to play in the game. The Eagles forced a punt.
Knox County turned the ball over again. Blaine Robinson recovered around the 40 yard line. Time expired with Putnam County claiming the 28-8 victory. Knox County rushed 34 times for 131 unofficial yards and a touchdown.
Cameron Kirmse led the Eagles with nine carries for 58 yards unofficially. Tristan Lonberger was next with six attempts for 34 yards.
Keenan Gillaspy rushed six times for 12 yards. Gillaspy was 2-6 passing for 32 yards. Tristan Lonberger had a nine yard catch for Knox County. The Eagles had three penalties for 35 yards. Knox County held the ball for about 23 minutes to 25 for Putnam County.
Putnam County recorded 17 first downs to 11 for the Eagles unofficially. Putnam County rushed 53 times for 287 yards according to their official statistics. The Midgets did not attempt a pass during the game. Putnam County had two penalties for 20 yards.
Putnam County was plus three in turnovers. The Midgets recorded two quarterback sacks on the night. Keenan Gillaspy punted three times for a 28 yard average.
“It was no surprise. We knew they were going to give (Kyle Hoskins) the ball 45 times. We practiced against it all week,” said Knox County head coach Steve Ramer. “We have talked all year about how you can’t turn the football over and we can’t have penalties.”
 “Every one of those things happened. The option was working for us. We were moving the ball fairly well,” said Steve Ramer. “We either had a penalty or a fumble. You are not going to win football games that way.”
“If we turn the ball over and if we have penalties against Milan, it’s going to be a darn good football game. We will have a good football game against everybody we play. If we fumble the ball seven times and have that many penalties we will get beat in every football game we play and that’s all there is to it.”